Central America

Minimizing Impacts – Maximizing Benefits

Costa Rica has developed a diversified tourism model primarily based on the natural resources of the country. It includes different tourism offers which are conducted in parallel. There is no dependency and no displacement by the cruise industry, unlike in other Caribbean destinations …

Cruise Tourism in the Caribbean

In May 2016, when Carnival Cruise’s ‘Fathom Adonia’ docked in Havana, Cuba officially became the last remaining Caribbean nation to be integrated into the region’s large-scale cruise tourism network. This modern-day cruise industry dates from the 1960s, when the three major cruise lines …

Fishery and Tourism in the Caribbean

“Sea, sand and sun is what tourists look for in the Caribbean”, says Mitchel Lay. The 52-year-old father of five is from Antigua and Barbuda. He goes to the seaside himself almost every day. However, unlike the tourists not in order to swim, but to fish. As a professional fisherman and …

Legal Frameworks for Local Development

In Costa Rica, coastal communities in the Gulf of Nicoya, indigenous groups and peasant communities in buffer zones of protected areas have been sharing a common fate. The legal insecurity about their land tenure limits them in their socio-economic activities. They may have high quality …

Assessment of the Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change of the Tourism Sector in Small Island Developing States – A Case Study of Grenada

Since the end of the 19th century, the increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and halocarbons, in the atmosphere have had accelerating impacts on the natural greenhouse effect and thereby caused anthropogenic climate change. The largest contributor is the greenhouse gas CO2, whose atmospheric concentration increased by 40% since pre-industrial times due to fossil fuel emissions and net land use change emissions (cf. IPCC 2013, pp. 11ff).

Sun and Sand, Rum and Reggae

The Caribbean economy has been historically designed to meet colonial priorities and tourism, too, serves the interests of the North. Tourism built around four infamous “S’s”: sun, sea, sand and sex has led to disruptive behaviours, raising issues of human dignity that invite a response …

Waiting for a Law for Costa Rica's Coastal Communities

With increased large-scale investments in tourism and real estate, coastal communities in Costa Rica have found themselves under growing pressure to give up their land and resources. The tourism lobby found ways to displace local communities by sponsoring land use planning. As Ernest …

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